Taika: The Planet of the Giving Tree

A beacon of hope for Earth’s troubled ecosystem, the Giving Tree extends a cosmic branch, welcoming earthlings into it’s embrace...

It is a time of great change on Planet Earth. A long prophesied time of darkness and destruction, when many humans have lost their way and original connection to their natural home and purpose. Technological advances and mysterious, unprecedented events are pushing humanity into an unknown future… and it is in these uncertain times that a group of scientists discover a new planetary body in the far reaches of the galaxy…Planet Taika, the home of the Giving Tree.

Since humanity now faces an imminent threat of extinction, the humans are eager to probe Taika as a promising possible location for colonisation. They select a male among them, whose name is Eden, to explore the potential of this new planet. Driven by a dream of saving humanity from self-destruction, Eden prepares himself to venture through space and assess the potential of life on Planet Taika…

The first test launch is successful, and Eden faces the great unknown, alone. He endures a rough journey, with little supplies. With oxygen running low, he approaches the targeted planet. As he reaches Taika, Eden’s ship starts to malfunction. It is not suitably prepared for the atmosphere. Upon entry, the pressure increases until Eden is rendered unconscious.

Although the ship is badly damaged from the impact, Eden’s pod manages to land safely and open up. A rush of fresh, clean air awakens him. Dizzy and disorientated, Eden recognises that his blood sugar levels are dangerously low. Grasping for a chocolate bar from a compartment above him, Eden tears off the paper and ravenously consumes it as he gets out of the pod, absently tossing the wrapper onto the ground. As he looks up, a gargantuan glowing tree looms over him, its roots spreading far and wide. As he gazes up at it, Eden realises that the pod damaged some of its branches as it landed. He has an intuition he is being watched, but everything seems still and calm and nothing approaches, so he rallies himself to make his report.

Evaluating the area, Eden concludes that the planet is primitive, as there are no signs of intelligent life. Making his way to the tree, he leaves a trail of waste, carelessly tearing off the seals and packaging of his instruments and tools to

make his assessment. When he reaches the trunk of the tree he sits down, leaning against it, and falls into a deep sleep. Strange creatures surround him, and tie him up with silk strings. Unknown to Eden, his arrival was anticipated, and his every move has been monitored by unseen, uncountable eyes. The watchers now move in around him in synchronised formations, working in rhythmic movements that are choreographed to music exuding from their own bodies.

When Eden wakens, he is immediately aware of the language being spoken by the creatures surrounding him, and the expressive symbiosis of sound and movement they are generating. Surprised, he finds he can understand their communication, and comes to learn that he has disturbed their land. Unable to speak the language himself, Eden can only listen, and discovers that the elders of the tribes of Planet Taika have decided to keep him captive until they decide his fate.

During his first few days on Taika, Eden looks for ways to escape. He discovers that he is weak and helpless compared to the natives, who are intelligent and adept, graceful and efficient. The ways of the tribes are alien to him and he is fascinated and afraid, watching them move and perform rituals, which are like nothing he has ever seen before. He has a profound sense that he has found the utopia of his dreams, and a safe place where humans can arrive and thrive, but despairs that he has been rejected by the inhabitants of the Planet. Many of the tribes are wary and suspicious of Eden, because of his behaviour when he first arrived. He fears for his life and for the future of humanity, convinced that he has shattered all hope with his foolish carelessness…

One day Lini and Lawi – two daughters of the Bamba Tua tribe – approach Eden with peace and serenity. They see past his fears and confusion, and instead look deep into his soul, acknowledging the strength and purity within him. Together, they free Eden from captivity, hiding him deep in the forest, where they begin teaching him about Taika, the Giving Tree, and their way of life…

Eden learns that three tribes live on the planet in peace and harmony with each other and nature: The Bamba Tua – a wise tribe that communicates through art,The La Wua Wi – a tribe of movement and dance, and the Karnaki – a tribe of sound and vibration. All the Taika tribes communicate with each other telepathically, and worship the holy Tree they live beneath. The tree provides them with air and food, gives wisdom to the chieftains, and life to all the plants of the Planet. Slowly, Eden starts to understand where he and humanity have

gone wrong… At first he longs to fulfil his vision of saving the human race, but soon he begins to forget Earth, immersing himself in the peace and beauty of life on Taika…

As the long days grow longer, Lina and Lawi teach Eden more about their rituals and the ways of their tribe. Humbled and grateful for their help, Eden is quick to learn and adapt. He comes to see his own ignorance, and the arrogance of humanity and their attempted intrusion. One evening at dusk, when both moons are visible in the sky, Lina and Lawi bring Eden to one of the temples tended by the priestesses of Karnaki. He has learned from them of Taika’s many temples, each one dedicated to a purpose and maintained by the priestess of a single tribe, although all tribes are welcome in every temple. Before they enter, Lina and Lawi explain to Eden that this the Karnaki temple of communication, which allows the Taikans to connect with the web of life linking them to the surrounding Universe, and communicate with other planetary bodies.

There is a tree in the centre, as in all Taika temples, its roots spreading in a wide circle and its crown reaching high above them. By now Eden knows the Giving Tree is the heart of Taika, and the source and sustenance of all life upon it, and he prostrates himself before the tree. A priestess comes forward, appearing from nowhere, and Eden kneels before her. Lina and Lawi speak to her telepathically, in vibrations he has not yet learned. She reaches out and marks Eden’s forehead with the red earth of Taika. Then she retires, taking Lina and Lawi with her. Eden is left alone before the alter, as darkness falls. Gradually, bodies of light emerge from the walls of the temple. They are shaped like female humans, naked and eyeless, their skin covered in intricate patterns. They surround him, moving in many directions at once, and singing a language he has never heard before, but has somehow known forever. Eden stays in the temple all night with them.

By the time the first priestesses arrive at dawn for the morning ritual, the strange creatures have gone. He describes them to the priestesses, and learns that they are the Goddesses of Dar, a neighbouring Planet. Although not indigenous to Taika, the Goddesses of Dar have long been called upon by the Karnaki as supernatural beings with healing powers, and are revered by all the Taikan tribes as sacred messengers of the Cosmic Mother – the pervasive interplanetary spirit who birthed all Giving Trees into being.

Later that morning, Lina and Lawi return to the temple, and bring Eden back to the Bamba Tua village, eagerly proclaiming the news. Now that he has been

accepted by the priestesses of the Karnaki, Eden is no longer an outcast, since all Taikan tribes honour and cultivate wisdom from the same source, therefore never oppose the actions or insights of the other tribes. In this way they cultivate growth in all things, and live in harmony with each other. The news of Eden’s story travels fast around the planet, evoking great wonder and excitement. Unknown to Eden, the Goddesses of Dar rarely appear, and are renowned as some of the most elusive and mystical beings in the galaxy.

Lina and Lawi have taught Eden how to clearly articulate ideas and feelings telepathically, and Eden is able to ask the Bamba Tua for their forgiveness and help. That night, while Eden sleeps, the elders and chieftains of the tribes gather at the Giving Tree. Eden dreams of the Goddesses of Dar, whirling and swirling around him and singing their endless song. When he wakes, dawn has broken, and the elders of the Bamba Tua have returned. They explain that they are sending Eden back to earth, so he can share all that he has learned with his fellow humans. His task is to share the teachings through art and music, so they will always be able to reach the humans whose eyes and ears are open. For his own safety, and to protect Taika from invasion, some of Eden’s memories will be removed, leaving only the information that is most needed. This, the Bamba Tua explain to him, is the safest way the guardians of the Giving Tree can give humanity the chance to change their ways, in time to avoid their own extinction.

And so Eden leaves Planet Taika, entrusted to share the wisdom and ways of the Giving Tree with the human race. If he can fulfil the vision of the Bamba Tua, the ways of Taika will be weaved into songs and visions, cultivated by creativity, and celebrated by the dreamers and dancers of Planet Earth for generations to come. Humanity will hear the message of the Giving Tree…and once again learn to live as guardians of nature and their earthly home…

Taika: The Planet of the Giving Tree

A beacon of hope for Earth’s troubled ecosystem, the Giving Tree extends a cosmic branch, welcoming earthlings into it’s embrace...

It is a time of great change on Planet Earth. A long prophesied time of darkness and destruction, when many humans have lost their way and original connection to their natural home and purpose. Technological advances and mysterious, unprecedented events are pushing humanity into an unknown future… and it is in these uncertain times that a group of scientists discover a new planetary body in the far reaches of the galaxy…Planet Taika, the home of the Giving Tree.

Since humanity now faces an imminent threat of extinction, the humans are eager to probe Taika as a promising possible location for colonisation. They select a male among them, whose name is Eden, to explore the potential of this new planet. Driven by a dream of saving humanity from self-destruction, Eden prepares himself to venture through space and assess the potential of life on Planet Taika…

The first test launch is successful, and Eden faces the great unknown, alone. He endures a rough journey, with little supplies. With oxygen running low, he approaches the targeted planet. As he reaches Taika, Eden’s ship starts to malfunction. It is not suitably prepared for the atmosphere. Upon entry, the pressure increases until Eden is rendered unconscious.

Although the ship is badly damaged from the impact, Eden’s pod manages to land safely and open up. A rush of fresh, clean air awakens him. Dizzy and disorientated, Eden recognises that his blood sugar levels are dangerously low. Grasping for a chocolate bar from a compartment above him, Eden tears off the paper and ravenously consumes it as he gets out of the pod, absently tossing the wrapper onto the ground. As he looks up, a gargantuan glowing tree looms over him, its roots spreading far and wide. As he gazes up at it, Eden realises that the pod damaged some of its branches as it landed. He has an intuition he is being watched, but everything seems still and calm and nothing approaches, so he rallies himself to make his report.

Evaluating the area, Eden concludes that the planet is primitive, as there are no signs of intelligent life. Making his way to the tree, he leaves a trail of waste, carelessly tearing off the seals and packaging of his instruments and tools to

make his assessment. When he reaches the trunk of the tree he sits down, leaning against it, and falls into a deep sleep. Strange creatures surround him, and tie him up with silk strings. Unknown to Eden, his arrival was anticipated, and his every move has been monitored by unseen, uncountable eyes. The watchers now move in around him in synchronised formations, working in rhythmic movements that are choreographed to music exuding from their own bodies.

When Eden wakens, he is immediately aware of the language being spoken by the creatures surrounding him, and the expressive symbiosis of sound and movement they are generating. Surprised, he finds he can understand their communication, and comes to learn that he has disturbed their land. Unable to speak the language himself, Eden can only listen, and discovers that the elders of the tribes of Planet Taika have decided to keep him captive until they decide his fate.

During his first few days on Taika, Eden looks for ways to escape. He discovers that he is weak and helpless compared to the natives, who are intelligent and adept, graceful and efficient. The ways of the tribes are alien to him and he is fascinated and afraid, watching them move and perform rituals, which are like nothing he has ever seen before. He has a profound sense that he has found the utopia of his dreams, and a safe place where humans can arrive and thrive, but despairs that he has been rejected by the inhabitants of the Planet. Many of the tribes are wary and suspicious of Eden, because of his behaviour when he first arrived. He fears for his life and for the future of humanity, convinced that he has shattered all hope with his foolish carelessness…

One day Lini and Lawi – two daughters of the Bamba Tua tribe – approach Eden with peace and serenity. They see past his fears and confusion, and instead look deep into his soul, acknowledging the strength and purity within him. Together, they free Eden from captivity, hiding him deep in the forest, where they begin teaching him about Taika, the Giving Tree, and their way of life…

Eden learns that three tribes live on the planet in peace and harmony with each other and nature: The Bamba Tua – a wise tribe that communicates through art,The La Wua Wi – a tribe of movement and dance, and the Karnaki – a tribe of sound and vibration. All the Taika tribes communicate with each other telepathically, and worship the holy Tree they live beneath. The tree provides them with air and food, gives wisdom to the chieftains, and life to all the plants of the Planet. Slowly, Eden starts to understand where he and humanity have

gone wrong… At first he longs to fulfil his vision of saving the human race, but soon he begins to forget Earth, immersing himself in the peace and beauty of life on Taika…

As the long days grow longer, Lina and Lawi teach Eden more about their rituals and the ways of their tribe. Humbled and grateful for their help, Eden is quick to learn and adapt. He comes to see his own ignorance, and the arrogance of humanity and their attempted intrusion. One evening at dusk, when both moons are visible in the sky, Lina and Lawi bring Eden to one of the temples tended by the priestesses of Karnaki. He has learned from them of Taika’s many temples, each one dedicated to a purpose and maintained by the priestess of a single tribe, although all tribes are welcome in every temple. Before they enter, Lina and Lawi explain to Eden that this the Karnaki temple of communication, which allows the Taikans to connect with the web of life linking them to the surrounding Universe, and communicate with other planetary bodies.

There is a tree in the centre, as in all Taika temples, its roots spreading in a wide circle and its crown reaching high above them. By now Eden knows the Giving Tree is the heart of Taika, and the source and sustenance of all life upon it, and he prostrates himself before the tree. A priestess comes forward, appearing from nowhere, and Eden kneels before her. Lina and Lawi speak to her telepathically, in vibrations he has not yet learned. She reaches out and marks Eden’s forehead with the red earth of Taika. Then she retires, taking Lina and Lawi with her. Eden is left alone before the alter, as darkness falls. Gradually, bodies of light emerge from the walls of the temple. They are shaped like female humans, naked and eyeless, their skin covered in intricate patterns. They surround him, moving in many directions at once, and singing a language he has never heard before, but has somehow known forever. Eden stays in the temple all night with them.

By the time the first priestesses arrive at dawn for the morning ritual, the strange creatures have gone. He describes them to the priestesses, and learns that they are the Goddesses of Dar, a neighbouring Planet. Although not indigenous to Taika, the Goddesses of Dar have long been called upon by the Karnaki as supernatural beings with healing powers, and are revered by all the Taikan tribes as sacred messengers of the Cosmic Mother – the pervasive interplanetary spirit who birthed all Giving Trees into being.

Later that morning, Lina and Lawi return to the temple, and bring Eden back to the Bamba Tua village, eagerly proclaiming the news. Now that he has been

accepted by the priestesses of the Karnaki, Eden is no longer an outcast, since all Taikan tribes honour and cultivate wisdom from the same source, therefore never oppose the actions or insights of the other tribes. In this way they cultivate growth in all things, and live in harmony with each other. The news of Eden’s story travels fast around the planet, evoking great wonder and excitement. Unknown to Eden, the Goddesses of Dar rarely appear, and are renowned as some of the most elusive and mystical beings in the galaxy.

Lina and Lawi have taught Eden how to clearly articulate ideas and feelings telepathically, and Eden is able to ask the Bamba Tua for their forgiveness and help. That night, while Eden sleeps, the elders and chieftains of the tribes gather at the Giving Tree. Eden dreams of the Goddesses of Dar, whirling and swirling around him and singing their endless song. When he wakes, dawn has broken, and the elders of the Bamba Tua have returned. They explain that they are sending Eden back to earth, so he can share all that he has learned with his fellow humans. His task is to share the teachings through art and music, so they will always be able to reach the humans whose eyes and ears are open. For his own safety, and to protect Taika from invasion, some of Eden’s memories will be removed, leaving only the information that is most needed. This, the Bamba Tua explain to him, is the safest way the guardians of the Giving Tree can give humanity the chance to change their ways, in time to avoid their own extinction.

And so Eden leaves Planet Taika, entrusted to share the wisdom and ways of the Giving Tree with the human race. If he can fulfil the vision of the Bamba Tua, the ways of Taika will be weaved into songs and visions, cultivated by creativity, and celebrated by the dreamers and dancers of Planet Earth for generations to come. Humanity will hear the message of the Giving Tree…and once again learn to live as guardians of nature and their earthly home…